What if Teachers Could Extinguish Shame?

Shame permeates our schools and classrooms. Kids shame their peers and, sometimes, usually unwittingly, teachers shame their students.

Compassionate classrooms, detailed in Hacking Classroom Culture by Angela Stockman and Ellen Feig Gray, extinguish shame.

Read the excerpt below to find out how to eliminate shame in your space and design your own compassionate classroom.

EXTINGUISH SHAME

Reframing Vulnerability

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget

how you made them feel.

—MAYA ANGELOU, AMERICAN POET, MEMOIRIST AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST

THE PROBLEM: WE ARE QUICK TO JUDGE OUR STUDENTS

Whether we like to admit it or not, teachers have the potential to have a profound and lasting effect on our students. Sometimes we are remembered in ways that belie our best intentions. Ellen tells a story of when she was in AP American history class, more than 40 years ago. The teacher liked to call out students when they weren’t performing up to his expectations of how they should be participating in his class. For him, classroom discussion was of great value, as he believed we learn best from a free interchange of ideas and interpretations of the readings.

She vividly remembers how this teacher, in his desire to encourage participation, shamed a very quiet and anxious student when he said, in front of the whole class, “Robert, we haven’t heard from you at all this semester. I think I’ll replace you with a potted plant!”

When we feel vulnerable and are subject to shame, we shut down, retreat into ourselves, feel unworthy, and become embarrassed and unproductive.

To this day, her heart palpitates and she feels the tightness in her abdomen as she recalls this embarrassing event. And the shaming wasn’t even directed at her! It turns out that this student was painfully shy, extremely anxious, and the victim of teasing and bullying because he was so socially awkward.

When teachers shame students, or peers shame each other, trust is broken and connection is eroded.

Another experience Ellen recounts is that of one of her childhood friends, whose third-grade teacher made him stand in the garbage can on a regular basis, in the corner of the classroom, because he fidgeted in class, appeared uninterested in the lesson, and spent more time gazing out the window than completing his work. The teacher had decided that this student would never succeed and the only job he was fit for was as a sanitation worker, and she felt it was her responsibility to make a point of that to the whole class.

Ellen and her friend now laugh about this incident more than 50 years later, but the emotional trauma this teacher caused remained fresh for a long time and greatly affected his self-confidence in his own academic abilities. (Fortunately, that didn’t stop him from becoming the head of one of the world’s leading foreign policy think tanks after attending an Ivy League college and earning a PhD.)

Learn more about compassionate classrooms

What his third-grade teacher didn’t realize at the time was how bored he was with the lessons she was teaching and how he needed greater intellectual challenges to keep him focused. She also failed to realize that he was a naturally deep thinker, who would always be more engaged by what was going on inside his head than what was happening around him. Nonetheless, she was quick to judge, and relied on shaming to try to whip him into shape.

These examples of shaming and humiliation are extreme and tantamount to child abuse. Most of us are well meaning and would never intentionally hurt a student by shaming them with our words or actions. But classrooms are by nature potentially shaming places where students are subject to judgment, evaluation, assessment, grading, scoring, comparison, criticism and scrutiny for how they perform, behave and stack up against the rest, and what they say, do, and reveal about themselves on a daily basis. That makes schools the ultimate in vulnerability communities and students continually at risk for shaming and humiliation.

Add to that the social environment where students are made to feel less than by their fellow students through teasing, bullying, and shaming. As the adults in the room, we must be sensitive to the many, often subtle ways that kids may treat each other badly, including saying and doing hurtful things in your classroom, as well as through social media. Many students are coming to class feeling ostracized, fearful, threatened, anxious, bruised and distracted by these emotions. It is important that we appreciate their experiences and acknowledge how those experiences may contribute to their reticence.

It is collaborative and vulnerable, with everyone taking risks. And shaming is not an option….

When we feel vulnerable and are subject to shame, we shut down, retreat into ourselves, feel unworthy, and become embarrassed and unproductive. When teachers shame students, or peers shame each other, trust is broken and connection is eroded. This can happen even when we are not conscious of the power of our words and are not being purposefully shaming. For example, it’s common to hear teachers say things like “If you put as much time into your algebra homework as you spend playing in the band, you might be more successful.”

A comment like that is often meant to motivate a student to work harder, but in reality it makes them feel less than worthy, and inadequate. The teacher can reframe the comment with something like “I’ve seen you put a great deal of effort into practicing your guitar so you can play in the band. How might you spend more time studying for your math tests so you can master the problems? How can I help you pass this course?” Often it’s when we recognize and appreciate who our students really are that we can best help them become the best they can be.

We need to reframe the way we think about ourselves and our students. If we acknowledge their vulnerability—and ours—we can operate from a place of empathy and compassion and open ourselves up to seeing our students as human beings who want what we all want—to be loved, accepted, and to feel worthy of succeeding.

THE HACK: HONOR STUDENTS AS HUMAN BEINGS, NOT HUMAN DOINGS

Dr. Brené Brown points out that vulnerability is a human emotion that is neither good nor bad. In fact, she sees vulnerability not as a weakness, but as the core of all of our feelings. When we shame others we are derailing their courage to be vulnerable.

The truth is that all students, no matter their age, grade level, academic ability, or apparent self-confidence, come to class feeling vulnerable. When we acknowledge them as human beings, with complex emotional lives like our own, we are equipped to help them prepare to open themselves up to real learning. Shaming not only disrespects them, but may also set them up for failure, lack of engagement, low motivation, and a perpetual self-defeating attitude.

Learning entails taking risks, and it is our responsibility as teachers to create an environment where students can open themselves up to what’s possible, to try to reach their potential and to be embraced for who they are.

When we reframe vulnerability as having the courage to take risks, to be uncertain, and to expose ourselves emotionally, that’s when real growth, change and learning can take place. It is up to us to create an emotionally safe environment that is built on trust and respect, nurturing students’ potential rather than shaming them.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TOMORROW

There are a number of things you can do to shift the tone of your classroom to a more positive one. You have more power than you may think in creating a community that’s based on safety and trust, where students feel comfortable enough to open themselves up to learning. Here are some suggestions:

PRACTICE VULNERABILITY. Show your students you are vulnerable to being judged and shamed, just like they are. If you reveal yourself to them, they will open themselves up to letting you know them. On the first day of class, Larry Schwarz, whose story we shared in Hack 2, tells his students that who they see now is not who they will see tomorrow, in a week, in a month, or at the end of the semester.

“Right now, who you see is an overweight, older man, and you may be thinking things and making certain assumptions about me that you will find out are not true as you learn more about me and spend more time in this class.” When we admit we are all vulnerable, and reframe our vulnerability as an opportunity for authentic human connection, we have the potential to form healthy, positive teacher-student relationships of trust that foster learning on all levels—academic, social and emotional.

Learn more about compassionate classrooms

ILLUMINATE POTENTIAL SOURCES OF SHAME. By shining a bright light on what students may be worried about when they come to class as well as what they most wish for, we can normalize their feelings of vulnerability and begin to treat them with respect. Angela uses an exercise called “Wishes and Worries” when she works with students to assess their interests, their needs, and their fears, and to understand that they are not alone in their feelings.

She also uses what the students reveal to create agreements about how they will treat one another in class, and from time to time returns to the wishes and worries theme to check in on how she is keeping her promises to fulfill their wishes and create a space where their fears can be allayed. We have provided a protocol for Wishes and Worries for you to download, in the supplemental resources folder for Hack 5….

PROMPT POSITIVELY. Choose positive words when communicating with your students about their potential. When you assess a student’s progress with specific constructive feedback that’s grounded in positive reality, you are offering them useful feedforward that they can build upon. Even when you’re attending to flaws, it’s possible to frame your feedback in a way that builds your students’ confidence. Rather than saying “This is where you need to improve,” consider using “This is what you’re showing me you’re ready to try next.”

THE HACK IN ACTION

Ten years ago, Starr Sackstein began teaching English and journalism to eleventh and twelfth graders at the World Journalism Preparatory School. As a teacher in a traditional system, she became disturbed by the cutthroat competitiveness and lack of collaboration among her students. She observed how students were defining themselves and their worth exclusively through their grades, and not through what they were their learning. The A students flaunted their high-achieving status and held it over their less-than-A peers. Students who were getting grades of less than a 90 felt worthless, shamed, and less than, merely by virtue of the fact that they did not measure up.

She wondered what it would be like for them if she substituted the grading system with a feedback system that featured constructive comments. Starr was able to identify with her A students, as she was one herself. When she began to put herself in her students’ shoes she realized that they were ex

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periencing what she had as a student—there was nothing more important than achieving high grades. She remembered how her teachers constantly reminded students, “If you don’t do your work, it’s going to affect your grades.” And she became ashamed at what she calls some of the same “abuses of power” she was “perpetrating against her students, unknowingly.”

During report card season in 2011, Starr became acutely aware of the atmosphere of anxiety that pervaded everything at her school. What was notable to her was the anticipatory excitement that only the A students exhibited. “When report cards were handed out, there were either cheers or tears.” When she came to terms with how she was about to grade her students with letters, she compared that to how her own son in elementary school was being evaluated through what she considered much more informative and reflective narrative feedback.

She began to consider how she could better communicate her AP literature students’ progress and learning accomplishments  on their report cards. She wanted to change grading from an “isolated judgmental experience to a collaborative conversation.” She felt that it was “time to give students the words to talk about their learning, in a meaningful way.”

Starr brought more self-reflective student practices into class. And she began the conversation with her students: “What do grades mean to you?” At first there was frustration, especially among high performing students whose self-worth had been inextricably tied to their grades. She realized that “shifting the mindset around something like grades was hard work,” but she refused to “slip back” into the strict letter grading system. As she observed the process, she saw her students “engaged in learning, pushing boundaries, and articulating growth in ways they didn’t know teenagers could.”

She attributes these results to taking risks and trusting each other. The self-assessment no-grading system Starr has used with her students is continually evolving with the input of students. She continues to involve them in an iterative process of empathy, prototyping, testing, and refining as they go. It is collaborative and vulnerable, with everyone taking risks.

And shaming is not an option….

To learn more about extinguishing shame and designing compassionate classrooms, look inside Hacking School Culture here.

This excerpt is provided with permission from Times 10 Publications

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It’s a Hacky Spring Contest with an Awesome Grand Prize!

It might not feel like spring in the northeast and midwest United States, but we’re still Hacking Spring, with an amazing Hack Learning Twitter share contest!

We gave away more than $5,000 worth of books and T-shirts at Empower18 Conference last month, in in effort to spread the word about Hack Learning–a movement aimed at helping teachers and learners easily solve some of their biggest problems.

We’re still solving problems and giving stuff away

Spread the word about Hack Learning, and win!

All you have to do is share a cool, funny, unorthodox, amazing, hacky picture or video on Twitter, get plenty of engagement, and you’ll have a chance to win our Grand Prize!

Keep reading, because this starts TODAY and ends Saturday, April 7, 2018.

The Contest

  1. Take a picture or video of you or a friend or family member with your Hack Learning T-shirt, Empower18 Hack Learning booth pic, and/or a Hack Learning Series book.
  2. Share the pic/video on Twitter.
  3. In the share, mention @markbarnes19 and add #HackLearning. (NOTE: all shares MUST contain both @markbarnes19 and #HackLearning to be eligible to win.)
  4. Ask for likes and retweets (optional but helpful).
  5. The three Tweets with the most engagement (combined likes and retweets) win!

Prizes

3rd place — $50 Amazon Gift Certificate

2nd place — $75 Amazon Gift Certificate

GRAND PRIZE — 15 Hack Learning books, 1 coffee mug, 1 tote bag ($500 value)

When is the contest?

  • Start posting to Twitter NOW: Thursday April 5th
  • Contest ends: Saturday April 7th at 8 PM ET
  • Winners announced: Sunday April 8th at 11 AM ET

Tweet your pic NOW!

Hack Learning Ambassador at Empower18 Conference

Tweet a pic with you, a Hack Learning T or book, and/or our banner for a chance to win

What’s the purpose?

Simple: We want people to see Hack Learning books, so they’ll be inspired to check out one of education’s most powerful problem-solving movements. And we’re not afraid to enlist your help and incentivize sharing with cool prizes.

We give away more content than anyone–over $100,000 in FREE content to educators around the world in 2017 and 2018! After all, Hack Learning is not about making authors or publishers rich; it’s about making educators better!

Share your pic or video on Twitter now. Tag @markbarnes19 and #HackLearning. Promote your Tweet, so you can win!

NOTE: Hack Learning authors and team members are ineligible to win.

 

The Power of Unanswerable Questions

Let me begin with full disclosure: Before I learned about Unanswerable Questions in Hacking Mathematics, by Denis Sheeran, I thought just about everything math related was unanswerable. Admittedly, math has always been pretty elusive to me.

After reading about Unanswerable Questions, though, I’m looking at math and pedagogy differently.

Rather than talk around Denis Sheeran’s concept, I thought I’d just share it straight from the mathematician’s mouth–or at least from his book.

From Hacking Mathematics: 10 Problems That Need Solving, with permission from Times 10 Publications

THE PROBLEM: STATISTICS FILL DAILY

LIFE, BUT NOT MATH CLASSROOMS

You’ve just about finished a chapter in your textbook

or unit in your curriculum materials and then

you notice it, right there, staring you in the face. What

is it you see, menacingly staring back at you? The last

section of the chapter: the statistics section, sometimes

called “statistical connections” or “data around us” or

“modeling.” No matter what it’s called, it gets translated

by a lot of math teachers as “Skip me, you don’t have

time.” But don’t jump on the skipping bandwagon.

Find the mean. Find the median. Find the mode. Make

a bar graph or pie graph. What’s the probability of flipping

heads on a coin? Twice? These are the instructions

and questions that encompass the complete statistical

learning many of us received in middle school, mostly

with data sets of five to ten pieces of information. Some

of us who had more adventurous teachers may have even

made graphs of bivariate data and tried to come up with

our own lines of best fit using completely non-statistical

methods by employing our understanding of writing a

linear equation using two points.

 

 

 

 

We live in a different world now, where large data sets

are available instantly and calculation tools can organize

and calculate all we need to know in less time than it takes

to sharpen our pencils. It is no longer useful to spend our

time teaching arithmetic and calling it statistics. In today’s

classroom, the mathematics teacher has the opportunity

and responsibility to create statistical thinkers.

Unanswerable Questions will develop statistical thinkers

in your classroom.

Rather than dwell on the past, let’s look at the present

and the future for most of us. Our standards and materials

spell out the statistical concepts we are to teach. What has

changed for our students is that the standards no longer

ask for students to calculate and find statistical values,

but instead to recognize relationships, understand variability

and its effect, and make predictions based on

interpretation of data. In short, true statistical thinking

is missing. Statistics in today’s schools should be based on

Unanswerable Questions.

THE HACK: ASK UNANSWERABLE QUESTIONS

When we ask students to find the mean of the heights of

the twenty-three students in our class, we are asking them

to average numbers together, which is a very easy question

to answer and an even easier question to grade. Instead,

when we ask, “How tall is the seventh grade?” our students

must begin an investigation that takes them much deeper

into statistics. They will discuss how to obtain the necessary

information, devise a plan (one that likely won’t work

or is completely unrealistic), refine that plan, measure each

other, standardize their measurements, find means, graph

information, and maybe even come across the idea of a distribution

of data. That’s all before the teacher even needs to get involved.

Since up to this point in their mathematical education,

most questions have had numerical and final answers, the

desire to answer an unanswerable question will continue

to motivate the students to work and think and collaborate.

Finally, they will come to a point where they are

satisfied with their inexact solution to the problem, therein

revealing the heart of statistics: using what we know to

infer about what we don’t know until more information

comes along and either changes our minds or gives us a

reason to reopen the question. Unanswerable Questions

will develop statistical thinkers in your classroom.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TOMORROW

There’s a reason your textbook or curriculum source

has the stats section where they do. It’s very likely that

it ties into the unit you’re teaching in a deep, meaningful

way. Here’s how to start harnessing the meaning

and inspiring your students to think statistically.

Look at the statistics section first. See what

statistical concepts are connected to the lessons

you’re teaching in this unit, and work

backward. Find an Unanswerable Question

that you can share as you open the chapter,

and refer to the question throughout.

Find claims in the media to discuss. Every

single day, you can find stories in the media

with claims made about a company, a government

office, an auto manufacturer, or a

school. Present students with the opportunity

to debate those claims. It’s likely that in little

time, they’ll need a statistical process to back

up their claims.

Share the unlikely. Lottery winners, survivor

stories, and game show outcomes will foster a

statistical conversation in a hurry. When you

read about them or see statistics in the news,

make note of it and bring it to class to start

those conversations.

Find Unanswerable Questions in sports.

Don’t ask answerable questions, like what

a player’s batting average is now that he’s

struck out three times in a row. Dig deeper

for the Unanswerable Question, like asking if

batting average affects salary in baseball. Or

which baseball stat has the biggest impact on

player salary? Those are tough, if not impossible

to answer.

THE HACK IN ACTION

One of my favorite Unanswerable Questions comes from a

TV commercial that aired during my childhood. It involved

a cow, a fox, a turtle, an owl, and a boy. The Unanswerable

Question: How many licks does it take to get to the center

of a Tootsie Pop?

Show the old commercial to your class—it’s on YouTube.

Then, after fending off questions like, “Why does the

owl eat the lollipop?” and “Is this some kind of fable?”

and “Why isn’t the boy wearing any pants?” you can get

started.

The Answerable Questions:

What are the characteristics of a Tootsie Pop that we

need to take into consideration?

What is a “lick” for the purpose of the experiment?

What needs to be measured, and how?

In sixth grade, students need to be able to recognize that

a statistical question is one that anticipates variability in

the data. While the class is discussing and defining the

components of the Answerable Questions, they will see

that variability exists, even in their definitions, and as such,

will exist in their data. Even when they come to an agreement

on definitions and procedures, they will quickly find

that during the data gathering, different students are following

the procedures differently. This leads them directly

into the next question: What do we do with our data?

Students may have enough mathematical acumen at this

point to be able to make good, if not entirely correct, suggestions

as to what should be done with the data—so let

them. In my experience, by the third or fourth suggestion,

they come up with “Average it all together,” or “List it from

smallest to biggest,” and even “Graph it.” At this point, I

may break the class into teams to complete each of the different

valid suggestions and report back, or I may take one

of the suggestions and run with it, depending on the focus

of our previous and upcoming content instruction.

Click image to learn more

Sixth graders need to be able to describe the distribution

of the data using its overall shape, center, and spread,

and recognize that its center describes all the data at once,

while the spread (variation) describes how all the data is

different from each other. They also need to be able to

display the data on a number line (dotplot or histogram)

and describe the distribution in context.

I expect my sixth graders to be able to say: “After

licking both sides of our own Tootsie Pops until each student

reached the chocolate center, we counted the number

of licks per student on each side. The mean number of

licks was ##. This was more/less than I expected. When

we graphed the data, the distribution was almost symmetrical

except for one point which took many more licks

to get to the center. The median, or middle value, was

less than the mean, and I think that’s because of the large

number of licks it took on one Tootsie Pop. No one licked

more than ## times or less than ## times before reaching

the center.”

Remember, the goal with sixth grade is not to pass the

AP Stats test, but to introduce data-gathering methods,

require correct statistical language, and to develop the

ability to describe sets of data. To extend this to higher

grades, weigh the lollipops first and compare weight and

number of licks as a linear relationship. (There’s a surprise

ending to that one that I won’t divulge). Students

should also discuss whether or not the Tootsie Pops could

be called a “random sample,” and what randomness is

and why it is important.

— end excerpt

Learn more about Unanswerable Questions and other problems that need solving in Hacking Mathematics.

Available on Amazon

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Video produced by Tootsie Roll, 2012

Is your lesson relevant?

I get frustrated when I’m asked to do something irrelevant. Don’t you? And yet, many teachers dread when students ask, “When am I ever going to need to know this stuff?” It’s a rather obnoxious way of asking, “Is this lesson relevant?”

Now, picture this. You craft a lesson that is so relevant that you hope some kid inquires! This episode is designed to help you create such a lesson. To help in this mission is an awesome primary source.

Mitchell Charles

Mitchell Charles is an articulate young man destined for academic brilliance.

In World Civilization, we were meandering through a unit on the Industrial Revolution. This topic typically leaves some students cold. My challenge was to make it relevant.

I did this with the help of Elon Musk and Peergrade. Below is the lesson that Mitchell evaluates. Please feel free to commandeer some of it, or all of it!

Applying the Industrial Revolution via Elon Musk

History students often complain that what they study doesn’t seem relevant. You may have heard the cliche, History repeats itself. You may, or may not be persuaded by this idea, but hopefully you’ll concede that the study of history at least gives us templates through which we can better understand the present, making a lot of subject matter relevant.

Technological changes that are at work today have the potential of reshaping the world along the lines of the changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Studying how that unfolded has the potential to make a young person more adaptable.

Elon Musk is one of the world’s most interesting and perhaps most impactful citizens. Musk is determined to improve the way you live. He also is determined to help the USA win back it’s manufacturing advantage.

This man has the potential to create products and systems that are as impactful as anything we’ve studied so far. He was born under the yoke of Apartheid in South Africa and as soon as he was able, he migrated to Canada and then the USA. He’s now a US citizen.

I first became interested in Musk when I saw him appear on the Big Bang Theory years ago. 

We’ll focus on 4 of Musk’s objectives:

  1. SpaceX
  2. Tesla
  3. SolarCity
  4. The Boring Company

Job 1: Make it relevant: Become familiar with your topic by reviewing the links and conducting online research.

Job 2: Meet with other students who’ve been assigned the same focus. Dialogue about the company. You certainly don’t have to agree, but consider the views of your classmates.

Job 3: Individually, Respond to the prompts on the appropriate doc on Google Classroom.

Hacking Engagement Again

Click image to peek inside

Job 4: Upload your views to Peergrade.

Job 5: Evaluate your peer’s ideas via Peergrade.

Each student has been assigned a focus. Here are some links, but please don’t limit yourself to only the links I provide.

SpaceX

Start your research by visiting the company website. Then navigate to this objective article. Conduct research on this entity including a video search.

Tesla

Start your research by visiting the company website. Then, navigate to this objective article. Finally, conduct research on this entity including a video search.

SolarCity

Start your research by visiting the company website. Then, navigate to this objective article. Finally, conduct research on this entity including a video search.

The Boring Company

Start your research by visiting the company website. Then, navigate to this objective article. Finally, conduct research on this entity including a video search.

Elon Musk Reaction Prompt

Build your responses based on your research. Each prompt is worth 10 points. Elaborate on your ideas. Don’t just give 1 word, or 1 phrase answers. Compose a narrative for each prompt.

  • Pretend that you are Elon Musk. You’re appealing to a number of venture capitalists with the goal of having them invest. Provide your audience with a sales pitch. This has nothing to do whether you…as in you personally, not as in you pretending to be Elon Musk…think the venture will be successful.
  • Indicate whether you think this venture is feasible. Don’t just respond yes or no. Explain why, or why not, you think it’ll work.
  • The inventions of the Industrial Revolution changed people’s lives in fundamental ways. Do you believe this venture will change lives and if you do, in what way and if you don’t, why not?
  • Pretend that you’re in this class and it’s 200 years in the future. Your instructor, who is a remarkably improved version of yours truly, asks you to describe Elon Musk, place him in context, and describe his significance.
  • Indicate something that you would like to see invented. This needs to be an innovation that will dramatically improve life on earth. Describe it, explain how it works, and predict how it will improve life.

click image to learn more

Apply the Hack Learning Formula

The Problem:

Students often feel lessons are not relevant.

The Solution:

Craft lessons where kids are challenged to apply what you’re teaching to their lives.

What you can do Tomorrow:

  • Brainstorm real world applications for tomorrow’s lesson
  • Break your students into 4 topics or problems and then challenge them to respond to provocative prompts
  • Have kids submit their work to Peergrade and then watch a virtual Socratic Seminar unfold before your eyes

Teaching relevance is the responsibility of every educator. Teaching relevance will empower you to embrace the question, “Why do we have to learn this?”

Listen to “94-Usher in Relevance Courtesy of Elon Musk and Peergrade…Starring Mitchell Charles” on Spreaker

 

A version of this first appeared at JamesAlanSturtevant.com

kid hates school

My Kid Hates School But You Can Help

One social share can immediately impact change. “My kid hates school,” I shared on Twitter and Facebook, and suddenly I had support from people around the world.

Here’s what happened. I tweeted this then shared it on Facebook.

School must get all kids to comply. School must organize large quantities of children, manage them, sort them, quiet them and control them. For a lot of kids it may not be a big deal. For some, it’s like stealing their soul. — Anonymous

Some weighed in by raging against the machine:

One regular commenter in this Facebook group had this initial response:

No, you can’t. You can advocate, you can argue, and you can encourage him in a variety of ways. But you can’t change the school or the teachers–it’s not in your power. You can help him to find satisfaction in other ways/venues and maybe within the school or within certain classes. Teach him to hack his own way, eh?

After all of these incredible comments and suggestions, I kept coming back to the previous quote.

And I wonder, is this right? Is school change out of my control? Is it out of our control?

Or, is it possible that we have all the power, and we only have to choose to exercise it?

At the very least, one expert, New York Times bestselling author Jessica Lahey, believes that we need to keep showing the evidence of what’s best for kids to educators. Here’s what the author of Gift of Failure tweeted:

What You Can Do Tomorrow

  • Talk about best practices: Create discussions on social channels and at your school about best practices. Ask, “How can we eliminate old school methods and replace them with progressive pedagogy that inspires student engagement?”
  • Share stories like this one: Share podcasts, blog posts, and Facebook statuses, in which parents and educators discuss their experiences about kids who hate school and what they’re doing about it.
  • Encourage participation: If a kid hates school, encourage her to join a club, go out for a sport, or try out for the play. The more kids participate in things related to school, the more likely they are to start enjoying it.
  • Be present: Talk to teachers, school leaders, and parents in your own school district–especially where you kids attend school–about making learning fun. Don’t let them tell you it’s not about the fun; that’s a load of crap and simply not true.

So, what’s my final take on all of this? I’ll continue to advocate for my son, and I’ll continue pushing his teachers–and all educators–to be the absolute best they can be.

With your help, I believe we can make a difference.

More hacky stuff

Find the Facebook discussion here.

Share your thoughts on Twitter at the #HackLearning feed here.

Subscribe to the podcast here.